Are Neural networks obsolete

Lynn Parramore: Obsolete Humans? Why Elites Want You to Fear the Robot
With the help of advanced algorithms based on neural networks this

By Lynn Parramore, senior editor at Alternet. Cross posted from Alternet

Editor's note: This is the third part in an ongoing series on job insecurity.

Machines have been relieving humans from drudgery and delighting us with their marvelous feats for thousands of years. Consider the Antikythera mechanism, a Hellenistic wonder of wood and bronze gears that charted the movements of the heavens, thought to be the first analog computer. The island of Rhodes was so famous for its automata, as ancient robots were known, that Pindar wrote an ode in their honor:

The animated figures stand
Adorning every public street
And seem to breathe in stone, or
Move their marble feet.
—(trans. Rev. C. A. Wheelwright, 1830), Seventh Olympic Ode (95)

Do we still hold robots in such high esteem? It depends on how the economy is doing.

Robot Revolution?

When economic times are good, machines are celebrated as wonders of progress and prosperity that will improve our lives. But when times are tough, they become objects of fear. The unemployment crisis of the past four years was triggered by a Wall Street-driven financial crash, and exacerbated by policy makers who failed to do enough to stimulate the economy and to ensure that there’s enough demand for goods and services. But lately, a new argument for job insecurity has made a splash in the media: It’s the machines! Pundits predict the “end of labor, ” and talk about armies of sleek robots taking over the workplace as a foregone conclusion. Dystopian fantasies worthy of a late-night sci-fi flick flood the airwaves.

Source: naked capitalism

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Short answer

2001-06-13 12:10:13 by datamouse

An article in Rolling Stone (October 20, 1994) by Adam Miller called J. Philippe Rushton a 'professor of hate,' someone who 'takes money from an organization with a terrible past' (the Pioneer Fund, a foundation said to have an orientation toward eugenics). He is accused of being 'obsessed with intelligence and genetics' to the point of having 'racist' attitudes by Jeffrey Rosen and Charles Lane in The New Republic symposium on IQ (October 31, 1994). They single out Rushton for linking ethnocentricism to genetic factors; this in turn subjects him to the broad brush of being, along with Richard J. Herrnstein and Charles Murray, 'Neo-Nazis' Newsweek (October 24, 1994). In The Chronicle of Higher Education (October 26, 1994) critiquing Herrnstein and Murray's The Bell Curve it is clear...

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