Statistical Learning Neural Networks

Statistical Learning - Bayesian Logic
Journal of Machine Learning Research, 3:148. Dhillon, I. S., Y. Guan

Bayesian logic


Named for Thomas Bayes, an English clergyman and mathematician, Bayesian logic is a branch of logic applied to decision making and inferential statistics that deals with probability inference: using the knowledge of prior events to predict future events.

Bayes' Theorem is a means of quantifying uncertainty. Based on probability theory, the theorem defines a rule for refining an hypothesis by factoring in additional evidence and background information, and leads to a number representing the degree of probability that the hypothesis is true. To demonstrate an application of Bayes' Theorem, suppose that we have a covered basket that contains three balls, each of which may be green or red. In a blind test, we reach in and pull out a red ball. We return the ball to the basket and try again, again pulling out a red ball. Once more, we return the ball to the basket and pull a ball out - red again. We form a hypothesis that all the balls are all, in fact, red. Bayes' Theorem can be used to calculate the probability (p) that all the balls are red (an event labeled as "A") given (symbolized as "|") that all the selections have been red (an event labeled as "B"):

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HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

2012-03-24 11:15:27 by cheaters_get_fucked!

Shortly after going public on Friday, shares of BATS were halted, after a series of technical glitches and system errors that affected trading in Apple and other companies. Several hours later, BATS pulled its public offering, a rare move for a company.
The exchange has also been clouded by an ongoing S.E.C. inquiry into its technology systems and trading strategies. BATS disclosed in a February regulatory filing that it had recently received a "written request" from the S.E.C.’s enforcement division, which was seeking documents and information about its ties to "certain market participants." The agency is examining the relationship between the exchange and high-frequency trading firms.

Federal securities regulators are examining whether some sophisticated, rapid-fire...

Online broker service (which is best??)

2006-03-24 19:15:44 by craigborcherding

Hello,
I'm looking for feedback from anyone who is especially happy (or unhappy) with their online broker service (i.e. e-trade, etc...)
I'm trying to determine what would be best for someone looking to invest approx. $10K and won't be trading everyday (and thus won't use any of the premium heavy trading online platforms).
I'm looking at e-trade, scottrade, and ameriquest and from the looks of it scottrade seems the best by far?
any oppinions or firsthand feedback much appreciated.

Criminal cheaters fuck themselves in the ass!

2012-03-26 12:59:45 by HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

Serves you right, fuckers!

The initial public offering of a computerized stock exchange turned into a major debacle on Friday as a software glitch sent its shares plunging to a fraction of a cent in a matter of seconds, leading it to scotch the IPO.
On Thursday night, BATS had priced the sale of 6.3 million of its shares at $16 apiece, for a total offering of over $100 million. But when shares started trading on Friday morning on its own exchange, they instantly plunged and trading was halted.
Within nine-tenths of a second from that opening, BATS stock had fallen to about 28 cents, according to Nanex, a stock-market data tracker. Within 1.5 seconds, the price bottomed at...

High frequency cheaters

2012-03-23 10:09:40 by -

Federal securities regulators are examining whether some sophisticated, rapid-fire trading firms have used their close links to computerized stock exchanges to gain an unfair advantage over other investors, people familiar with the matter say.
The wide-ranging probe, being handled by the enforcement staff of the Securities and Exchange Commission, is focusing on the computer-driven trading platforms of exchanges, including BATS Global Markets Inc., the people said.
The SEC probe illustrates a bigger push by regulators to examine less-transparent parts of the securities markets, such as the fast-growing area of so-called high-frequency trading. High-speed trading firms use powerful computer systems for rapid-fire trades, in which they often hold stocks for only fractions of...

The SEC already has determined

2009-07-07 07:38:18 by Lapis_Philosophus

That they will do nothing about automated trading platforms. They have no interest in regulating them whatsoever
The Securities and Exchange Commission believes institutional money managers are “sophisticated” enough to trade against the machines without further regulation.
“We don’t want to curtail liquidity,” said Gene Gohlke, associate director for the SEC. Gohlke said it’s up to the managers themselves to make sure other traders aren’t manipulating their models.

Back to the brain  — The Hindu
For want of a credible explanation, hypotheses of what really goes on in it apart from a high-speed relay of electrochemical signals has reached also into quantum physics, a probabilistic realm that doesn't set much store by causes and effects. Apart ...


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